Pakistan Geography

 

  • Southern Asia, bordering the Arabian Sea, between India on the east and Iran and Afghanistan on the west and China in the north
    30 00 N, 70 00 E
    Asia
    total: 796,095 sq km
    land: 770,875 sq km
    water: 25,220 sq km
    country comparison to the world: 37
    slightly more than five times the size of Georgia; slightly less than twice the size of California
    Area comparison map:
    total: 7,257 km
    border countries (4): Afghanistan 2,670 km, China 438 km, India 3,190 km, Iran 959 km
    1,046 km
    territorial sea: 12 nm
    contiguous zone: 24 nm
    exclusive economic zone: 200 nm
    continental shelf: 200 nm or to the edge of the continental margin
    mostly hot, dry desert; temperate in northwest; arctic in north
    divided into three major geographic areas: the northern highlands, the Indus River plain in the center and east, and the Balochistan Plateau in the south and west
    mean elevation: 900 m
    elevation extremes: lowest point: Arabian Sea 0 m
    highest point: K2 (Mt. Godwin-Austen) 8,611 m
    arable land, extensive natural gas reserves, limited petroleum, poor quality coal, iron ore, copper, salt, limestone
    agricultural land: 35.2%
    arable land 27.6%; permanent crops 1.1%; permanent pasture 6.5%
    forest: 2.1%
    other: 62.7% (2011 est.)
    202,000 sq km (2012)
    the Indus River and its tributaries attract most of the settlement, with Punjab province the most densely populated
    frequent earthquakes, occasionally severe especially in north and west; flooding along the Indus after heavy rains (July and August)
    water pollution from raw sewage, industrial wastes, and agricultural runoff; limited natural freshwater resources; most of the population does not have access to potable water; deforestation; soil erosion; desertification; air pollution and noise pollution in urban areas
    party to: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Environmental Modification, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, Ozone Layer Protection, Ship Pollution, Wetlands
    signed, but not ratified: Marine Life Conservation
    controls Khyber Pass and Bolan Pass, traditional invasion routes between Central Asia and the Indian Subcontinent
  • Source: CIA – The World Factbook

 

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